A Delicate Balance – Individualism and Government Power – Part 2

At the start of the pandemic, the strong hand of government eliminated social and economic freedoms, striking a new balance between individualism and government power.     Today, as social and economic activity restarts, partisan tensions reappear and are growing.  This signals a return of individaulism.  Can the individualistic spirit thrive in this new enviornment?  Can itContinue reading “A Delicate Balance – Individualism and Government Power – Part 2”

A Delicate Balance – Individualism and Government Power

A Delicate Balance – Individualism and Government Power The coronavirus pandemic exposes the delicate balance between individual liberties and government power.  At the onset, when government officials pursued policies that prioritized public health – lockdowns and social distancing – the public complied.  After all, the severity of the disease was unknown.  And footage from ChinaContinue reading “A Delicate Balance – Individualism and Government Power”

Obama and Trump. Different but Similar – Part 1

Barack Obama, a youthful 47-year-old former constitutional law professor and community organizer, campaigned on hope and change, and in 2008 became the first African American elected president.  His speeches were persuasive, eloquent and at times inspiring.  Obama charmed audiences, large and small, and his demeanor projected poise and stability.   His inauguration, held in the depthsContinue reading “Obama and Trump. Different but Similar – Part 1”

Trump Celebrates 49% Public Approval

In the final Gallup poll of March, President Trump’s public approval tied his previous high of 49% and improved 5-points from another Gallup survey fielded two weeks before.  Trump quickly highlighted the achievement.  He also touted a 60% public approval of his handling of the pandemic.  And on twitter, Trump bragged about the lofty televisionContinue reading “Trump Celebrates 49% Public Approval”

From a “Do Nothing” to a “Can Do” Congress

Why does nothing happen in Congress?  With legitimate frustration, people regularly ask me this question.     It does seem we frequently have a “Do Nothing Congress”, a phrase made popular by Harry Truman during his successful 1948 campaign.   In fact, observers noted late last year the lapses of the current Congress, distinguishing itself as oneContinue reading “From a “Do Nothing” to a “Can Do” Congress”